• Ronson Culibrina, Salva-Vida, 2018, oil on canvas, 231 x 365 cm
  • Ronson Culibrina, Sea Escape, 2018, oil on canvas, 231 x 365 cm
  • Ronson Culibrina, Above Sea Level 1, 2018, oil on canvas, 152 x 213 cm
  • Ronson Culibrina, Above Sea Level 2, 2018, oil on canvas, 152 x 213 cm
  • Ronson Culibrina, Littoral Zone, 2018, oil on canvas, 152 x 152 cm
  • Ronson Culibrina, Sea of Change, 2018, oil on canvas, 152 x 152 cm
  • Ronson Culibrina, Mainland Quest, 2018, oil on canvas, 121 x 152 cm
  • Ronson Culibrina, Propelling the streams, 2018, oil on canvas, 121 x 152 cm
  • Ronson Culibrina, Vain Aquatic Capital, 2018, oil on canvas, 121 x 152 cm
  • Ronson Culibrina, Pukot Boy (Scuba Ranger), 2018, resin & steel, edition of 3, variable dimensions

Ronson Culibrina

Above Sea Level

Curated by Ruel Caasi

26 August - 16 September 2018

Yavuz Gallery is pleased to present Above Sea Level, the first solo exhibition of Filipino artist Ronson Culibrina with the gallery.

Above Sea Level presents scenes of a coastal town on the verge of decline due to human exploitation. Inspired by a crisis confronting the artist’s own hometown in the Philippines, Culibrina’s new works tell the tale of a town amidst a conflict between survival and progress, struggling to preserve ecological harmony and balance.

Culibrina veers away from apocalyptic, desolate depictions of a moribund ecosystem, instead visualising this conflict through frenzied, carnivalesque seascapes that appropriate humourous pop-culture references both formally and conceptually. A crowding of stilt houses, boats and fishermen sit amongst a floating McDonald’s sign and Balloon Dog by Jeff Koons in one painting while Yayoi Kusama’s polka-dotted tentacles rise up from the sea in another, chasing fishermen donning virtual reality sets. These interventions create chaotic yet playful scenes that picture an environment’s deterioration from the forces of exploiting resources through both traditionally-established means and contemporary technologies. Above Sea Level captures Culibrina’s reflections on his formative environment and the anxieties emerging from its rapid transformation, resonating with larger, global concerns of society’s unsustainable and adverse mass consumption of the natural world.